I’m not afraid to admit that I like flying foxes and zip lines. There’s no shame in enjoying the childhood sensation of flying through the air and soaring like a bird, albeit for a brief second. Well, now on the NSW Central Coast you can supersize that feeling on the world’s longest rollercoast zip line – an attraction that takes the childhood thrill and turns it into an experience being universally embraced by the young and old.

The Crazy Rider Xtreme at Tree Tops Adventure Park on the Central Coast is located just 90 minutes’ drive from Sydney, and is one unique thrill ride through the Ourimbah State Forest that will redefine your prior interpretation of a zip line. This insane bird-like sensation takes place on a 1.3km long track, around 6 stories high above the canopy, and is guaranteed to be one of the most unique attractions you’ll ever experience.

After a safety gear fitting, it’s a short hike through the forest to the top launch platform. I’m harnessed into a safety sling, clipped on to the railing, and thrown off a platform. After starting off modestly in speed, momentum takes over and you’re soon soaring through the tree tops.

All sounds pretty standard right? Wrong! This zip line is different from traditional attractions not only due to its setting in the Australian bush; it’s anything but one straight zip line on a decline. Rather, it’s a series of around 40 different obstacles which twist and turn, zig and zag, spin and drop you through the forest. There are three 360 degree loops, and one 540 metre circle, with a number of sharp turns and jolts that throw me excitedly all through the air. It’s the unexpected movement of the ride which really gets the adrenalin pumping, and I’m overtaken with fits of laughter and a wide smile all the way down.

The most amazing thing about the ride is that the entire set up is completely fixed to existing trees in the Ourimbah State Forest. Not one single metal beam or pole was erected to hold the actual zip line – every cable and bolt is attached through a complex and systematic method to the trees themselves. It’s an incredible engineering achievement that really embraces its natural Australian setting.